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Filling In The Gaps

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Posted by Mario Dovalina on September 14, 2001 22:10:52 UTC

How often do we take any unknown phenomena and unthinkingly, loosely apply it to God? For the more religious among us, quite often. Anything unknown by science is God's realm for some.

However, how many unknown phenomena, when uncovered, support the theory of God's existence? Before we understood orbits, the sun was thought to be the wheels of Apollo's chariot, or was pushed by Ra, or so on. Without any knowledge of the universe around them, to the ancients evidence of God was everywhere. Now, once we realize there is no pushing or chariot driving neccesary, we push the realm God works from further and further back.

As the strength of our knowledge increases, the percieved strength of God decreases. As we understand our universe more and more, it becomes increasingly apparant that there simply is no room for the kind of God we all would like to believe in.

Consider: Would a geologist believe the world to be 6000 years old? Probably not. And would an electrical engineer believe that lightning is thrown by God? Probably not. But is there anything preventing the geologist from believing in God throwing lightning? Is there anything preventing the electrician from believing that the world is 6000 years old? No, because they lack knowledge in such areas: God inhabits the gaps in our knowledge, and we attempt to fill in our ignorance by saying "God did it."

But as we get less and less ignorant, it becomes increasingly apparant that the God of dogmatic religion simply can not logically exist.

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