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Classical Physics Education Need Not Be Trapped By Jargon

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Posted by Michael W. Pearson on December 15, 2004 23:15:58 UTC

It covers a distance and when the applied force becomes week it has to drop on ground.

was answered: This makes no sense.

It could, if you figure in the "layman's prerogative."
Applied force seems here to be a term meant to refer to the amount of mass and the direction of the travelling object -- a clue, though sometimes incomplete, to the quantity of the energy that was applied to the stone that was thrown. (One would have to know if the thrower was travelling and a few other things about the
place one is graphing these slopes on.

A layman might say the "force becomes weak" to convey that the equation of that travelling object's mass and direction, as you subtract the accumulating increments of gravity and air resistance over time, gives
a smaller and smaller number describing the amount of energy remaining from the original number.

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