Back to Home

God & Science Forum Message

Forums: Atm · Astrophotography · Blackholes · Blackholes2 · CCD · Celestron · Domes · Education
Eyepieces · Meade · Misc. · God and Science · SETI · Software · UFO · XEphem
RSS Button

Home | Discussion Forums | God and Science | Post
Login

Be the first pioneers to continue the Astronomy Discussions at our new Astronomy meeting place...
The Space and Astronomy Agora
Your Interpretation Of The Bible Is Not The Definitive Answer

Forum List | Follow Ups | Post Message | Back to Thread Topics | In Response To
Posted by John Morgan Powell on April 9, 2001 18:09:07 UTC

Your interpretation of the Bible is not necessarily what the ancients believed.

I don't think that Old Testament prophets considered God to be of such a nature that the reasoning man could not find Him. They would have argued that reason forces one to accept God. However, when their arguments didn't seem to sway you they would have been inclined to call in the religious mob to use force to make their point. Where reasoning fails, violence can still win the argument.

Later Christian philosophers incorporated more modern philosphies about God such as being big enough to be omnipresent, but small enough to dwell in your heart and other incomprehensible things. The O.T. prophets did not believe in the Trinity, for example. That's a later invention.

The whole statement "The God of the Bible" is vague. Different authors had different conceptions of God. Even today you can listen to a husband and wife of the same religion pray to what appears to be a God of a different personality. We create God, not vice versa.

Follow Ups:

Login to Post
Additional Information
Google
 
Web www.astronomy.net
DayNightLine
About Astronomy Net | Advertise on Astronomy Net | Contact & Comments | Privacy Policy
Unless otherwise specified, web site content Copyright 1994-2022 John Huggins All Rights Reserved
Forum posts are Copyright their authors as specified in the heading above the post.
"dbHTML," "AstroGuide," "ASTRONOMY.NET" & "VA.NET"
are trademarks of John Huggins