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Alex, Make A Choice...

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Posted by Mark on November 6, 2001 01:24:42 UTC

I think you must choose between the two "types" of photons: virtual or real?

Virtual can turn real and hence radiate away to distant observer (Hawking radiation) so nothing new here.

However if you are asking if a real photon can be seen by local observer (just a few feet away) that was born behind EH, then I would say the answer is NO. Afterall, why should real photon be created when the charge matter behind the event horizon has long since been destroyed? You may say that star appears to be in state of eternal collapse (red-shifting and becoming dimmer and dimmer), but then you're asserting that you see photon that was created just before star plunged beyond event horizon as percieved by outside observer. Perhaps approaching observer doesn't see receeding event horizon, but rather simply perceives receeding collapsing star(??). All emitted photons in this case, come from collapsing star, and astronaut can never tell at what point he crossed horizon. He simply thinks that he is chasing after surface of run-away star.

Distant observer simply sees astronaut freeze on the surface of vanishing star...(??)

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