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Sand Dune Trains Explained

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Posted by jpsimm on September 4, 2009 04:02:17 UTC

OK guys note how these are inclined to be present in shallow valleys between sandy hill like formations. Gravity plays an important role in the formation of these "signatures".

We have seen that there are commonly the little twisters just like here on Earth, on Mars. When one of these can, it will go "with gravity" that is, downhill. This is because of the differences in pressure and because of the sand held in rotation by them. When chance will allow one of these will simply "slide" down a gully picking up speed and material as it goes. When too much sandy debris is held it is released all at once and leaves a little slightly curved "dune" which looks like a moraine really. As soon as one is formed the twistie moves along a little more and picks up more material but then has to dump again. See a pattern forming? The process continues and hey what do you know we see a sand "train" which looks noteworthy. It is noteworthy but it is also natural. Surface dynamics on Mars is way different than on Earth.

JPS

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