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Posted by Bob Sal on April 12, 2002 12:39:25 UTC

What 10" SCT is that, the Meade LX200. Here's a couple of nice items to look for if you haven't seen them. In Cass, Open Cluster NGC457 the Dragon Fly. In Her, Galaxy NGC6207 very close to M13, probably get both in the same low power field. In Cyg NGC6826 the Blinking Planetary, it's very bright with averted vision but when looking directly at it, it vanishes. If you sweep across the field, it blinks. In Gem, NGC2392 the Eskimo Nebula, very much like the Ghost of Jupiter Nebula you saw. In Auriga, Open Cluster NGC2419 the Stingray. In Orion Open Cluster NGC2169 the "37", the stars form the number 37 inverted. In Aqu, NGC7009 the Saturn Nebula, another real nice planetary. In Mon, NGC2261 Hubbles Variable Nebula, this is kind of dim, looks just like a Comet. Try this Galaxy pair in CV, NGC4490/85. 4490 is magnitude 9.8 and big, right next to it is 4485 magnitude 12.0, small but bright enough to be seen easily. Great pair. There are tons more. Of course look for any Messier, They are all excellent. Have Fun.
That's it;
BOB SAL

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