Back to Home

God & Science Forum Message

Forums: Atm · Astrophotography · Blackholes · Blackholes2 · CCD · Celestron · Domes · Education
Eyepieces · Meade · Misc. · God and Science · SETI · Software · UFO · XEphem
RSS Button

Home | Discussion Forums | God and Science | Post
Login

Be the first pioneers to continue the Astronomy Discussions at our new Astronomy meeting place...
The Space and Astronomy Agora
Re: Re: Is That A Region Or A Blackhole?

Forum List | Follow Ups | Post Message | Back to Thread Topics | In Response To
Posted by Rich on November 26, 2000 19:31:29 UTC

So its just a blackhole. I thought you were talking about a region of space. I dig it, I know it.
About your inference of time not being a physical thing is mistaken, I believe. Sure time helps us define events, but it also has an existance in forces. Gravitation as we know it know is as of now, has time in it. An object falls to earth accelerating at 9.81 m's^2. Impact forces really heavily on time. Driving 50 mph and go right into a telephone pole, you're probably going to be seriously hurt. Instead if at 50 mph hit a series of bushes and it takes much longer to reach 0 mph, you're probably going to just increase your insurance premiums. Also, pulsars "pulse" at extremely accurate intervals of time. Once every 5.68859 secs for example.

Time may be invisible, but it probable does exist. Its just when something enters an event horizon, the time is transformed and we really don't understand enough about singularities to understand the transformation of time yet.

Follow Ups:

    Login to Post
    Additional Information
    Google
     
    Web www.astronomy.net
    DayNightLine
    About Astronomy Net | Advertise on Astronomy Net | Contact & Comments | Privacy Policy
    Unless otherwise specified, web site content Copyright 1994-2018 John Huggins All Rights Reserved
    Forum posts are Copyright their authors as specified in the heading above the post.
    "dbHTML," "AstroGuide," "ASTRONOMY.NET" & "VA.NET"
    are trademarks of John Huggins