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Re: Speculation Re Planet Orbiting Alpha Centauri 1

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Posted by richard futrell/">richard futrell on December 28, 1997 02:11:23 UTC

You should read up on Isaac Azimov(I think that is spelled right). He is one of the most respected astronomers today. He wrote a book entitled Alpha Centauri, inwhich he suggested that not only could a planetary sysyem exist within the gravitational forces of the two main stars, a life sustaining planet may exist there as well. The idiot who expressed his view of the system as three closely nit stars should be ignored. The third star is a white dwarf, which is located at a position that it's gravitational force is negligable to either star. Alpha Centuari 1 is a star much like our sun, and Alpha Centuari 2 is a star slightly smaller, a K1, star also capable of sustaining life; however less likely. No planet beyond Jupiter's orbit could exist in the Alpha Centuri 1 system because of the orbit of Alpha Centuari 2; however, a planet with the orbit of earth would feel negligable gravitational pull. It is possible that a life sustaining planet may exist within the orbits of Alpha Centauri 1 or Alpha Centauri 2. the gravitational pull of Alpha

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