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Actually Swelling Sun May Push Earth Away.

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Posted by Alexander on December 8, 2001 20:17:55 UTC

Because the speed of protons and electrons radiated by Sun is much more than the orbital velocity of Earth. So, strong solar wind will more likely cause higher outward pressure on Earth than dragging force. Sun, losing part of its mass via solar wind in red giant phase, will attract Earth weakier thus the Earth orbit may also spiral outward due to this factor as well (it is estimated that Earth may end up almost near Mars orbit (it won't collide with Mars because Mars will go close to Jupiter orbit, etc.

But the brightness of red Sun will indeed steadily increase to very high values (100+ current brightness, so even longer distance may not be enough for Eath to stay cool.

First, population and vegetation will migrate North and South (Antarctida will become nice place to live, especially during long polar night) as well as up into mountains. And when even there it will become too hot, we may be forced to dig deep into crust (in 1000 years heat/cold penetrates in it about 100 ft, in 1000000 years - about 3000 ft and so on).

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