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Re: Does Free-falling Electron Radiate?

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Posted by Bruce on January 25, 2001 05:38:30 UTC

Interesting question which I don't have an answer for. The local shell observer observes that the electron freely falling by his shell radiates. The observer in freefall and at rest with respect to the free falling electron notes that it does not radiate. Kip Thorne in his 'Black holes and Time Warps' discusses the discovery by William Unruh and Paul Davies that accelerated observers just above (and at rest with respect to) the event horizon see the sea of virtual particles as real particles emmiting radiation of a black body spectrum while freely falling observers note these same particles are only virtual. He goes on to say "This starling discovery revealed that the concept of a particle is relative, not absolute; that is, it depends on ones's reference frame". The far away observer (GR's bookkeeper) would note that the electron radiates all its energy into the gravitational field while never reaching the event horizon because the bookkeeper perceives the distance to the horizon to be infinite.
E/m=(1-2M/r)dt/dt
so when r->2M E/m->0. It must all have to do with the information each frame receives about the event.

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