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Posted by gym on February 7, 2000 05:41:23 UTC

An inch is divided harmonically:

1/1 1/2 1/4 1/8 1/16 1/32

A string divided this way reveals a sequence of octave notes while the inverse of this harmonic doubling is the base ten equivalents of the units in binary systems (1,2,4,8,16,32...like in this computer)... And since two times stringlength equals wavelength and wavelength times frequency equals speed... like "c" speed of light or speed of sound or a tire spinning along the ground (you know... the length around the tire times the time that length takes to pass equals speed: tirelengths per time period) then the stringlength, being the inverse of the frequency (1/2 string length vibrates 2 times the frequency)and the frequency, being the inverse of the string length, are all being taught to elementary school kids as "double ONE double it again, and again again agian while kindergardners are taught the basic harmonic overtone sequence as 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9, and oh, children, it's all so simple but it gets so complex so fast yet it always stays simple. Tied up in musical twists, especially when compared to chromatic stuff, "harmony or not?" remains the only question of the future.

Relate that! Every dividing cell does. Search for Ah...

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