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Re: Astrophysics

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Posted by mridul sharma/">mridul sharma on December 1, 1999 06:18:49 UTC

: there are many singularity theorems by penrose and : hawkins. but there is one paper which says that FINITE : MASS BLACKHOLES DO NOT EXISTS because if it is so then : collapse will continue for ever. though this paper : is still not accepted but if it is accepted then all : the theorems of hawkins will become invalidated!!! : though it looks very difficult to digest this fact : but anything is possible in science. : if one can discuss about this , i will be very happy. : reply from all the concerned is expected. : : Well, why couldn't the matter collapse forever? That could be the singularity. The surrounding event horizon could simply be the point at which escape velocity = the speed of light. So the matter could collapse forever, but the point at which its gravitational "well" or field is to intense, light can't escape. This explains a finite mass blackhole with a "forever collapse" at its center: the singularity. Nobody could ever disprove this unless they went into a blackhole. (at least that's what I would think)

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