Happy Halloween

Blackholes2 Forum Message

Forums: Atm · Astrophotography · Blackholes · Blackholes2 · CCD · Celestron · Domes · Education
Eyepieces · Meade · Misc. · God and Science · SETI · Software · UFO · XEphem
RSS Button

Home | Discussion Forums | Blackholes II | Post
Login

Be the first pioneers to continue the Astronomy Discussions at our new Astronomy meeting place...
The Space and Astronomy Agora
Re: Can Two Black Hole's Exist Side By Side??

Forum List | Follow Ups | Post Message | Back to Thread Topics | In Response To
Posted by Zephram Cochrane/">Zephram Cochrane on October 17, 1999 22:41:37 UTC

: Just far enough away so that they don't collapse into each other??

Sort of, one of the interesting phenomena LISA will hopefully detect is related to this. Two black hole could orbit a common center. For some time the orbit would be fairly stable, but they will radiate gravitational waves and the orbit decays. Eventually they begin spiraling into each other increasingly fast until they form a single hole. Due to the energy radiated away in the waves, the new black hole's mass will not be a linear sum of the old hole's masses. It will be a Pythagorean addition.

: What would occur at the point where the forces's of each where in exact balance??

There would be some frame dragging there. An object at the center that is not rotating in our remote coordinate frame will experience some centrifugal force (not fictitious in GR) there. This will be due to the rotation, not merely the tug of war the two holes will play on the object.

Follow Ups:

    Login to Post
    Additional Information
    Google
     
    Web www.astronomy.net
    DayNightLine
    About Astronomy Net | Advertise on Astronomy Net | Contact & Comments | Privacy Policy
    Unless otherwise specified, web site content Copyright 1994-2019 John Huggins All Rights Reserved
    Forum posts are Copyright their authors as specified in the heading above the post.
    "dbHTML," "AstroGuide," "ASTRONOMY.NET" & "VA.NET"
    are trademarks of John Huggins