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Posted by Duane Eddy on January 30, 2005 03:25:41 UTC

Einstein’s equation E = M x C^2 predicts that any energy added to a mass will cause that mass to increase.
This is not a large amount unless the velocities approach the speed of light.
An electron does attain very high velocities.

An electron has a rest mass and a mass due to its energy of motion.
If you measure an atom all of the energy of momentum is considered particle mass.
However both the “electron momentum energy”-mass and the electron “particle”-mass can be calculated separately.

The discovery of the electron reduced the amount of mass attributed to particles and increased the amount of mass associated with the energy of momentum.

Each discovery of smaller and smaller particle components in motion reduces the amount of particle mass and increases the mass associated with the energy of motion.

Do protons move?

Do quarks move?

If the ultimate result that all particles are ultimately composed of “photons as a standing wave” then there is no particle mass at all but only momentum mass.

This has not been proven of course, however it is interesting to note the trend.

Duane

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