Back to Home

Blackholes Forum Message

Forums: Atm · Astrophotography · Blackholes · Blackholes2 · CCD · Celestron · Domes · Education
Eyepieces · Meade · Misc. · God and Science · SETI · Software · UFO · XEphem
RSS Button

Home | Discussion Forums | Blackholes I | Post
Login

Be the first pioneers to continue the Astronomy Discussions at our new Astronomy meeting place...
The Space and Astronomy Agora
RE: Squeaky Springs(sp?) And ZPE...

Forum List | Follow Ups | Post Message | Back to Thread Topics
Posted by Brian Kirk Parquette on August 15, 2001 18:46:16 UTC

RE: Squeaky springs(sp?) and ZPE...
figure 19.8 page 513 serway physics 3rd edition. 'A
mechanical model of a crystalline solid. The
Atoms(solid spheres) are imagined to be attached to
each other by springs, which reflect the elastic
nature of the interatomic forces.'
'Most bodies expand as there temperature increases.
This phenomenon plays an important role in numerous
engineering applications. For example thermal
expansion joints must be included in buildings,
concrete highways, railroad tracks, and bridges to
compensate for changes in dimensions with temperature
variations. The overall thermal expansion of a body is
a consequence of the change in the average seperation
between its constituent atoms or molecules. To
understand this, consider a crystalline solid, which
consists of a regular array of atoms held together by
electrical forces. We can obtain a mechanical model
of these forces by imagining that the atoms are
connected by a set of stiff springs as in figure 19.8'

Follow Ups:

    Login to Post
    Additional Information
    Google
     
    Web www.astronomy.net
    DayNightLine
    About Astronomy Net | Advertise on Astronomy Net | Contact & Comments | Privacy Policy
    Unless otherwise specified, web site content Copyright 1994-2018 John Huggins All Rights Reserved
    Forum posts are Copyright their authors as specified in the heading above the post.
    "dbHTML," "AstroGuide," "ASTRONOMY.NET" & "VA.NET"
    are trademarks of John Huggins