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RE: RE: Is Matter In Black Hole Very Cold?

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Posted by CL on June 23, 2000 03:06:58 UTC

If you reduce the volume of an object, it`s temperature proportionately increases. Therefore, the harder you crush an object, the hotter it gets; so a black hole must be infinitely hot at the center. Also remember that heat energy is simply the average kinetic energy of the particles that make up an object. So you could reduce the kinetic energy of all particles to zero but never force the particles into a point simply by freezing an object. Therefore absolute zero doesn`t mean that an object is a point, it simply means it has no internal energy. One last thing.....I`m not sure that absolute zero is even theoreticaly achievable because of a principle of quantum physics (the uncertainty principle)stating that a particle cannot be brought to complete rest, because then you would know its momentum with infinite accuracy and therefore have not even the slightest clue of where to find it because its position would be indeterminable. Therefore the particle you "stopped" would be EVERYWHERE at once and NOWHERE to be found. Did I state this right? Somebody please let me know...

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