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Further Explanation On Gravitons

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Posted by Eric J. Andresen on July 29, 2006 19:50:51 UTC

What we see as mass is negative space attached to time elements (spin). In positive space (our familiar space), the acceleration axis is the charge axis, and the curvature around the particle are the curved momentum axes. The time element or spin, allows the 3d axes appear equivalent with no bias in acceleration (charge) or momentum (mass-gravity). In negative space, the converse is true...mass-gravity is the acceleration axis, and the charge are the curved momentum axes. The forces we think about are just manifestations of the configured gravitons...there could be higher- and lower-ordered manifestations of the gravitons also. There are no "pure" gravitons, because of the non-standard space. There could be some type of oscillation (or some other type of interplay) between positive and negative space that makes things appear the way we "think" is occurring...
There may be just the one true force of Time; Gravity, Electromagnetism, Strong Force, and Weak Force are just graviton "approaches" to make it appear they act like true forces.
I hope this is clearer.

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