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Human Characteristics For Time???

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Posted by Richard Ruquist on May 13, 2005 14:55:39 UTC

How can time "want" to do anything?

Time is a mathematical convenience to describe processes that follow the laws of physics. Now you could perhaps say that some particle or object "wants" to follow the trajectory perscribed by those laws. It may even be that particles have that sort of consciousness.

But time is just a parameter in the equations. The passage of time can be measured. But just as space is fixed by gravity from all the particles of the universe, time is also a fixed quantity, even more than space. Space can be curved. There is no indication that time can be curved. So it might be more accurate to say the "space wants" to be curved in response to a massive object.

But even with space curvature, changes happen instantly, so intention cannot be at work. Space is a slave to what massive bodies are doing. Time is not even responsive. It is even more fixed than space. So I cannot understand what you mean by time wanting something. Time is a parameter, not an object.

Perhaps you could find a different way to say the same thing.

Richard

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